Showing 246 results

Authority record

Saxon, Joyce Mauer

  • SF2021JSLL
  • Person
  • 1928-02-14 - 2015-11-16

Joyce Mauer was born in Chicago, Illinois to Bill and Cleo Mauer. At the age of five, a bout of tonsillitis spread to her eyes, damaging her vision. Childhood glaucoma caused additional damage to her vision and she became legally blind. Bedridden until the age of ten, Mauer began listening to music on the radio, especially swing, jazz, and classical. When she recovered her health, she began to play the piano. Her parents insisted that she hide her blindness and enrolled her in drama classes. As a teen she had some small parts on local radio. After high school, she began performing in local clubs around Chicago such as the Sherman House, Acorn on Oak, Danny's Hideaway, and Como Inn. She married and divorced Jack Reiling, then married Marty Saxon who managed her career. At 62, she began playing the piano at Nordstrom Department Store.

Grimes, Robert

  • SF2018RGRK
  • Person
  • 1922-02-18 - 2011-10-08

Robert “Bob” Grimes (February 18, 1922 – October 8, 2011) was born one of six children in Longview, Texas. Grimes served the Army during World War II, and later worked as a salesman for Patrick & Co. Stationery Firm in San Francisco. Grimes adopted three children, and received several honors during his lifetime, including having a Bob Grimes Day dedicated to him in San Francisco and receiving a Certificate of Honor.

During his lifetime, Grimes amassed one of the largest sheet music collections in the United States. From his early teens, when he bought his first piece of sheet music, "All My Life" from the little-seen 1936 musical "Laughing Irish Eyes," Grimes was an avid collector. Not only did he collect sheet music, he also collected books and LPs.

Goodelle, Niela

  • SF2018NGRK
  • Person
  • 1910-09-08 - 1988-05-26

Niela Goodelle Hartz (September 8, 1910 – May 26, 1988) was born Helen Goodelle in New York. In the 1920s, she worked as an accompanist for Burton Thatcher in exchange for vocal lessons. By the 1930s she was a budding Hollywood starlet, performing in Perfect Thirty Sixes, Rhythm of Paree, and Spring is Here. She was part of the touring production of Ziegfeld Follies of 1934. She is perhaps most famous for turning down a marriage proposal from Rudy Vallee in 1937.
In 1940, Goodelle retired at what was arguably the peak of her career and married Minton Hartz. She moved to Evansville, Indiana where she and Minton raised three children.

Sautter, Margaret Ann

  • SF2018MSRK
  • Person
  • 1924-04-04 - 2009-12-27

Margaret taught for 35 years in the Detroit Public School System and was considered an excellent and dedicated teacher. In addition to giving her very best to her students, parents and colleagues, nothing gave her more pleasure than providing others with entertainment and happy memories through singing, skits and plays. She belonged to First Bethany United Church of Christ and was active in the choir and other church activities. She was also a lifetime member of Wayne State University Alumni Association and Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority, and a regular contributor to many worthwhile charities. After retiring from teaching, she moved to California in 1985 to take care of her brother, Morey, Jr.

Helford, Irwin

  • SF2018IHRK
  • Person
  • 1934 -

Helford served as the Chairman of the Board of the Great American Songbook Foundation from 2007 - 2012.

Glenn, Albert "Al" Vincent

  • SF2018AGRK
  • Person
  • 1912 - 2008

Albert “Al” Vincent Glenn (1912-2008) was born and raised in Brockton, MA. He had his own orchestra called the Hotel Van Ness Orchestra that played at the Hotel Van Ness in Burlington, Vermont on Lake Champlain for about eighteen months in 1934-35. He also played at other hotels and resorts on the east coast and wrote many of his own arrangements. He moved to Berkley, California where he attended the University of California. There, he played with orchestras including Pete Dragon & His Orchestra in Oakland, CA. While in Oakland, he changed his last name from Getchie to Glenn. He graduated in 1941 as an optometrist and married Katharine (Kay) Wilson (a Berkley native); they had one daughter, Gay-Leigh Ann. During World War II he was stationed at Letterman Hospital at the Presidio in San Francisco.

Deutsch, Didier C.,

  • LC97082686
  • Person
  • 1937 -

Didier Deutsch is a French-born record producer who has produced more than 600 titles in fields as varied as pop, jazz, big bands, classical, soundtracks and Broadway shows. He was nominated for a Grammy in 1995 for his production of the 12-CD “Frank Sinatra: The Columbia Years (1943–1952) – The Complete Recordings,” and again in 2001 or the Columbia/Legacy 26-CD set, “Soundtrack For A Century.”
Deutsch was born in 1937 in Arcachon, France, and arrived in New York City in 1962. Initially after his arrival, he wrote professionally for a wide range of magazines and newspapers, including After Dark, Essence, and The New York Times, with a special emphasis on the theater, movies, and music. In 1973, following some years in public relations in the private sector, Deutsch became publicity director at CTI Records, the jazz label created by producer Creed Taylor. After that Deutsch held various publicity and managerial positions at Tappan Zee, RCA, WEA International, and Atlantic. During this time Deustch simultaneously began working for Legacy, the reissue label controlled by Columbia Records, now Sony Music.
Over the years, Deutsch has produced recordings by many artists signed to both Columbia and Epic (Tony Bennett, Johnny Mathis, Doris Day, Jerry Vale, Rosemary Clooney, Harry James, Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, etc.). On many of those, he wrote the liner notes that helped put these recordings into their proper historical perspective.
Among his many other achievements, Deutsch lists “The Great American Composers,” a 28-volume collection of the classic tunes written by the best Tin Pan Alley songwriters – Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, Duke Ellington, Hoagy Carmichael, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Johnny Mercer, and the Gershwins, among many others, representing more than 800 selections, for Columbia House and “The Best Of Broadway,” a multi-volume series surveying the songs written for the stage and screen, for Time-Life.
In addition to his activities as a record producer, Deutsch continues to be a presence on Broadway, each season reviewing the new musical productions for the German publication “Musicals” and for the French-language “Opérette/Théâtre Musical.” A recognized theater critic, he has been covering the Broadway musical scene for more than 45 years.

Murphy, Rose

  • LC95034322
  • Person
  • 1913 - 1989-11-16

Sandler & Young

  • LC95014379
  • Corporate body
  • 1963 - 1982

Singing duo Sandler & Young performed internationally from 1963-1982.

Sherman, Joe

  • LC94075463
  • Person
  • 1926-09-25 -

Perito, Nick

  • LC93076272
  • Person
  • 1924-04-07 - 2005-08-03

Nick Perito was an American composer, arranger, and band leader, and for 40 years the closest collaborator of singer Perry Como. Perito was nominated for a dozen Emmys, primarily for Como specials and televised presentations of the Kennedy Center Honors in the 1980s and early '90s. Perito joined Como in 1963 as the singer's long-running "The Perry Como Show" was ending, and stayed on as his music director and conductor for frequent television specials, tours and recording sessions. Perito also handled the music for television specials for Andy Williams, Bing Crosby, and Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme. He played piano in recording sessions for Steve & Eydie and for Julius La Rosa, among others. For the big screen, Perito scored the 1968 comedy "Don't Just Stand There," starring Robert Wagner and Mary Tyler Moore.

He began playing the accordion at a young age and soon started performing at parties. He received a scholarship to the Lamont School of Music, studying at the University of Denver. Perito was drafted in 1943 and served as an Army medic in New York during World War II; he also played piano and did musical arrangements for the Army band. Perito remained in New York after World War II, entering the Juilliard School of Music and graduating from the college in 1949.

Perito returned to Denver in 1946 and worked at Denver's KOA with his own weekday radio program. After that, he went back to New York, where he worked as a songwriter, arranger, and accordion/piano session musician. Perito also had his own band that had a permanent spot at Jack Dempsey's Broadway Restaurant, owned by the boxer. His first association with Perry Como came through Como's arranger, Ray Charles, in the early 1950s. Como had recorded a novelty song, "Hoop-De-Doo", and Perito was hired to accompany him on accordion for television performances of the song. He also became the musical director of United Artists Records in 1961.
Perito's other credits include the Kennedy Center Honors, American Film Institute awards, The Don Knotts Variety Show, and the Andy Williams and Bing Crosby television specials. Perito wrote the music for the 1968 film, Don't Just Stand There! with Robert Wagner and Mary Tyler Moore. Perito was also an influential arranger of background music for Muzak in the late 1960s and early 70s. He became the musical director for Bob Hope in 1993 and worked with Hope's wife, Dolores, when she decided to pick up her singing career after 60 years. Perito, along with musicians Dick Grove and Allyn Ferguson, was a founder and partner of the Grove School of Music in Van Nuys, California; the school was accredited in 1979 but closed in 1991. His work earned Perito a dozen Emmy nominations a year before his death of pulmonary fibrosis at the age of 81 on August 3, 2005 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, CA.

Andrews, Maxene, 1916 - 1995.

  • LC93074908
  • Person
  • 1916-01-03 - 1995-10-21

Maxene Andrews was the middle of the three Andrews sisters, and usually sang the higher harmony part in the trio. She had a successful comeback as a cabaret singer in the late 1970s and toured regularly through the 1980s, even releasing a solo album in 1985. She died from a heart attack at the age of 79.

Billman, Larry

  • LC93032525
  • Person
  • 1938-10-23 - 2017-05-03
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