Showing 200 results

Authority record

Arnold, Hubert

  • 85173096
  • Person
  • 1945-03-02 - 2019-08-22

Born and raised in Temple, Texas, Arnold attended Michigan State University where he earned undergraduate and master's degrees in Music Composition. His music career began in West Point, New York as an arranger for the United States Military Academy Band. He established a successful music career in New York City where he worked with numerous entertainers over the years. Notably, he was the music director and accompanist for the legendary Margaret Whiting, working with her for over 25 years.
His compositions in classical, Latin and jazz were commissioned, published, and recorded by organizations around the country. Additionally, Tex has written orchestrations for the Lincoln Center American Songbook series and for Carnegie Hall tributes.
For six years, Arnold participated as mentor and accompaniest in the Great American Songbook Foundation’s annual Songbook Academy event for teens.

Martin, Tony

  • 85376559
  • Person
  • 1913-12-25 - 2012-07-27

Voynow, Dick

  • 93022669
  • Person
  • c. 1900 - September 15, 1944

Gorney, Jay

  • LC 89006629
  • Person
  • 1896-12-12 - 1990-06-04

August, Jan

  • LC 94006657
  • Person
  • 1904-09-24 - 1976-01-17

Jan was born Jan Augustoff in New York City, the youngest of five children. Jan’s parents, having paid for music lessons for the four older siblings who lacked any musical aptitude, chose not to repeat the mistake with their youngest. Jan learned to play the piano by ear as a child; as an adult he learned to read and arrange music. He mastered the xylophone, vibraphone and Solovox as well as the piano. In 1946, his instrumental recording of “Misirlou,” a Greek folk song, sold more than 1,000,000 records.
As a young man, Jan performed as a pianist with the Paul Specht Band in Greenwich Village nightclubs. In the 1930’s, Paul Whiteman invited him to play in his orchestra; Jan also performed with Ferde Grofé. With the musical shift from jazz to swing in the 1940’s, Jan returned to performing solo in clubs. His style attracted the attention of Irving Gwirtz of Diamond Records, who signed him to a recording contract. He received union scale wages of approximately $35 for his recording of “Bob-a-Loo” and “Misirlou”; the recording reached the Top Ten on the charts and launched his career.
Jan hosted and performed on radio, notably a 15-minute weekly broadcast on the Mutual Radio Network from 1947-1948. In 1948 and 1950, he appeared on "The Toast of the Town" and from 1949-1951 he accompanied singer Roberta Quinlan on her NBC variety show. Later he hosted "Jan August’s Revere Camera Show". In 1949, he served as the subject of a 9-minute film short entitled "Audition for August" with Kitty Kallen. In the 1950’s, Jan signed a recording contract with the Mercury label recording instrumental versions of popular hits laced with Latin rhythms. He also toured with his own orchestra in the United States and Canada. After arranging and recording more than 140 songs, Jan retired in 1967. He died of heart disease about a decade later.
Shortly before Jan's death, a musician performing under the name Jan August made the news in Florida, but it was an imposter.

Andrews, Patty, 1918 - 2013.

  • LC00068999
  • Person
  • 1918-02-16 - 2013-01-30

Patty Andrews was the youngest of the three Andrews sisters, the lead singer for the group, and usually sang the melody part in the trio. She pursued a solo career after the group broke up, occasionally reuniting with Maxene for reunion tours in the 1960s and '70s. She died of natural causes at the age of 94.

Hope, Dolores

  • LC2006038770
  • Person
  • 1909-05-27 - 2011-09-19

Staiger, Libi

  • LC2007035169
  • Person
  • 1928-01-10 - 2019-09-25

Kahn, Donald

  • LC2008127545
  • Person
  • 1918-07-17 - 2008-04-11

Donald Gustav Kahn (July 17, 1918—April 11, 2008), the only son of Gus and Grace LeBoy Kahn, was born in Chicago during the early phase of his father’s songwriting career. He realized as a five-year old that he wanted to follow in his father’s musical footsteps, but as a composer and arranger, not a lyricist. Donald studied music at Pomona College and served in the Air Force during World War II. In 1956, he collaborated with noted lyricist Stanley Styne to create his most popular work, “A Beautiful Friendship.” The song was recorded by a number of artists including Ella Fitzgerald, Margaret Whiting, Frank Sinatra, and Nat King Cole. In the 1970s, Donald wrote music for Sesame Street. Although he labored in the shadow of his father, he worked tirelessly to keep his father’s legacy alive and was a strong proponent for Whoopee!, a 1990s revival of Whoopee.

Andrews, LaVerne, 1911 - 1967.

  • LC2008129501
  • Person
  • 1911-07-06 - 1967-05-08

LaVerne Andrews was the oldest of the three Andrews sisters, the founder of the group, and usually sang the lowest harmony part in the trio. She died after a prolonged battle with cancer at the age of 55.

Kennedy, Bob

  • LC2008153153
  • Person
  • 1922 - 2008-06-26

Lloyd, David

  • LC2011090811
  • Person
  • 1934-07-07 - 2009-11-10
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