Showing 169 results

Authority record

Gilbert, Ray

  • LC85381424
  • Person
  • 1912-09-15 - 1976-03-03

Raymond “Ray” Gilbert (September 5, 1912 – March 3, 1976) was an American lyricist. He is best known for writing the lyrics to the song “Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah”, which won the 1947 Academy Award for Best Original Song. Although the song originally appeared in the 1946 Disney film Song of the South, it has been used in a variety of other Disney productions since, such as the television program Wonderful World of Disney. Gilbert also wrote English lyrics for another Disney film, The Three Cabelleros (1944), which featured a number of songs translated from their original Spanish and Portuguese.

In addition to writing lyrics for a number of songs that were part of Disney films, Gilbert is known for translating many songs by Latin American composers into English, particularly those of Brazilian composer Antonio Carlos Jobim. Gilbert also collaborated with American composers to produce several original hits, such as “In A World Of No Goodbyes” and “Drip Drop” with Hoagy Carmichael. He is also responsible for the lyrics for the 1965 Andy Williams hit “… And Roses and Roses.”

Glenn, Albert "Al" Vincent

  • SF2018AGRK
  • Person
  • 1912 - 2008

Albert “Al” Vincent Glenn (1912-2008) was born and raised in Brockton, MA. He had his own orchestra called the Hotel Van Ness Orchestra that played at the Hotel Van Ness in Burlington, Vermont on Lake Champlain for about eighteen months in 1934-35. He also played at other hotels and resorts on the east coast and wrote many of his own arrangements. He moved to Berkley, California where he attended the University of California. There, he played with orchestras including Pete Dragon & His Orchestra in Oakland, CA. While in Oakland, he changed his last name from Getchie to Glenn. He graduated in 1941 as an optometrist and married Katharine (Kay) Wilson (a Berkley native); they had one daughter, Gay-Leigh Ann. During World War II he was stationed at Letterman Hospital at the Presidio in San Francisco.

Goodelle, Niela

  • SF2018NGRK
  • Person
  • 1910-09-08 - 1988-05-26

Niela Goodelle Hartz (September 8, 1910 – May 26, 1988) was born Helen Goodelle in New York. In the 1920s, she worked as an accompanist for Burton Thatcher in exchange for vocal lessons. By the 1930s she was a Hollywood starlet, performing in various shows and movies with the likes of Buddy Rogers. She is perhaps most famous for turning down a marriage proposal from Rudy Vallee in 1937.
In 1940, Goodelle retired at what was arguably the peak of her career and married Minton Hartz. She moved to Evansville, Indiana where she and Minton raised three children.

Gorney, Jay

  • LC 89006629
  • Person
  • 1896-12-12 - 1990-06-04

Grimes, Robert

  • SF2018RGRK
  • Person
  • 1922-02-18 - 2011-10-08

Robert “Bob” Grimes (February 18, 1922 – October 8, 2011) was born one of six children in Longview, Texas. Grimes served the Army during World War II, and later worked as a salesman for Patrick & Co. Stationery Firm in San Francisco. Grimes adopted three children, and received several honors during his lifetime, including having a Bob Grimes Day dedicated to him in San Francisco and receiving a Certificate of Honor.

During his lifetime, Grimes amassed one of the largest sheet music collections in the United States. From his early teens, when he bought his first piece of sheet music, "All My Life" from the little-seen 1936 musical "Laughing Irish Eyes," Grimes was an avid collector. Not only did he collect sheet music, he also collected books and LPs.

Harris, Phil

  • LC80146364
  • Person
  • 1904-01-24 - 1995-08-11

Haymes, Dick

  • LC91036885
  • Person
  • 1918-09-13

Helford, Irwin

  • SF2018IHRK
  • Person
  • 1934 -

Helford served as the Chairman of the Board of the Great American Songbook Foundation from 2007 - 2012.

Hope, Bob

  • LC50028460
  • Person
  • 1903-05-29 - 2003-07-27
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