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Feinstein, Michael

  • LC88626481
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1956-09-07 -

Michael Jay Feinstein (born September 7, 1956) is an American singer, pianist, and music revivalist. He is an interpreter of, and an anthropologist and archivist for, the repertoire known as the Great American Songbook. He currently serves as Artistic Director for The Center for the Performing Arts in Carmel, Indiana.
Feinstein was born and raised in Columbus, OH, where he started playing the piano by ear at age 5. He worked in local piano bars after graduating from high school and moved to LA when he was 20, where he was introduced to Ira Gershwin in July 1977. Feinstein became Gershwin’s assistant for six years; this assignment led to six years of researching, cataloguing and preserving the unpublished sheet music and rare recordings in Gershwin's home which earned him access to numerous unpublished Gershwin songs, many of which he has since performed and recorded.
By the mid-1980s, Feinstein was a nationally known cabaret singer-pianist famed for being a dedicated proponent of the Great American Songbook. In 1986, he recorded his first CD, Pure Gershwin (1987), a collection of music by George and Ira Gershwin. He followed this in quick succession with Live at the Algonquin (1986); Remember: Michael Feinstein Sings Irving Berlin (1987); Isn't It Romantic (1988), a collection of standards and his first album backed by an orchestra; and Over There (1989), featuring the music of America and Europe during the First World War.
By 1988, Feinstein was starring on Broadway in a series of in-concert shows and in the early 1990s, Feinstein embarked on an ambitious songbook project wherein he performed an album featuring the music of a featured composer, often accompanied by the composer; he proceeded to release a number of albums on several labels through 1989. In 1999, Feinstein lent his name to a new nightclub in New York located in the Regency Hotel, as Feinstein's at the Regency became a venue for sophisticated cabaret entertainers including its namesake. In the late 1990s, Feinstein recorded two more albums of Gershwin music: Nice Work If You Can Get It: Songs by the Gershwins (1996) and Michael & George: Feinstein Sings Gershwin (1998).
In 2000, the Library of Congress appointed Feinstein to its newly formed National Recording Preservation Board, an organization dedicated to safeguarding America's musical heritage. Feinstein earned his fifth Grammy Award nomination in 2009 for The Sinatra Project, his CD celebrating the music of “Ol’ Blue Eyes.” His Emmy Award-nominated TV special Michael Feinstein – The Sinatra Legacy, which was taped live at the Palladium in Carmel, IN, aired across the country in 2011. Feinstein was named Principal Pops Conductor for the Pasadena Symphony in 2012 and made his conducting debut in June 2013 to celebrated critical acclaim. He launched an additional Pops series at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in Palm Beach, Florida in 2014. Feinstein's memoir The Gershwins and Me: A Personal History in Twelve Songs about working for Ira Gershwin was published in the fall of 2012, accompanied by a CD of Feinstein performing the Gershwin brothers' music discussed in the book. Feinstein opened his new nightclub, Feinstein's at the Nikko in San Francisco's Nikko Hotel in May 2013, Feinstein's/54 Below at New York's Studio 54 in 2015 and also plans for a future nightclub in London.

Madrick, Stephen A.

  • SF2018SMRK
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1910-08-03 - 1995-12-17

Sautter, Margaret Ann

  • SF2018MSRK
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1924-04-04 - 2009-12-27

Margaret taught for 35 years in the Detroit Public School System and was considered an excellent and dedicated teacher. In addition to giving her very best to her students, parents and colleagues, nothing gave her more pleasure than providing others with entertainment and happy memories through singing, skits and plays. She belonged to First Bethany United Church of Christ and was active in the choir and other church activities. She was also a lifetime member of Wayne State University Alumni Association and Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority, and a regular contributor to many worthwhile charities. After retiring from teaching, she moved to California in 1985 to take care of her brother, Morey, Jr.

Helford, Irwin

  • SF2018IHRK
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1934 -

Helford served as the Chairman of the Board of the Great American Songbook Foundation from 2007 - 2012.

Goodelle, Niela

  • SF2018NGRK
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1910-09-08 - 1988-05-26

Niela Goodelle Hartz (September 8, 1910 – May 26, 1988) was born Helen Goodelle in New York. In the 1920s, she worked as an accompanist for Burton Thatcher in exchange for vocal lessons. By the 1930s she was a Hollywood starlet, performing in various shows and movies with the likes of Buddy Rogers. She is perhaps most famous for turning down a marriage proposal from Rudy Vallee in 1937.
In 1940, Goodelle retired at what was arguably the peak of her career and married Minton Hartz. She moved to Evansville, Indiana where she and Minton raised three children.

Hope, Bob

  • LC50028460
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1903-05-29 - 2003-07-27

Arlen, Harold, 1905 - 1986

  • LC82155108
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1905-02-15 - 1986-04-23

Harold Arlen was an American composer, arranger, pianist, and vocalist who is considered one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. He wrote over 400 songs but is most famous for composing the songs for the classic 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, particularly “Over the Rainbow,” which was voted the 20th century’s No. 1 song. Arlen wrote some of the greatest hits from the 1930’s and 40’s, such as “Get Happy,” “Stormy Weather,” “It's Only a Paper Moon,” “I've Got the World on a String,” and “Last Night When We Were Young.” He was most prolific from 1929 through the 1950s.
He was born as Hyman Arluck in Buffalo, New York in 1905 to Jewish parents. The son of a Jewish cantor (a trained song-leader for Jewish services) and pianist, Arlen showed exceptional musical talent in childhood. Hyman loved to sing, but was extremely shy. His mother hoped that he would become a music teacher, so she introduced a piano into the Arluck home. Hyman began studying around the age of nine and quickly outgrew the neighborhood piano teacher. He went on to study with the leading local teacher, who was also a conductor, organist and composer. Before long, Hyman left school as a teenager and achieved some local success working as a vocalist and pianist in different bands. He moved to New York City in the 1920s, where he worked as an accompanist in vaudeville and changed his name to Harold Arlen. Arlen composed several songs during that period, but published the first of his many well-known pieces in 1929, "Get Happy", with lyrics by Ted Koehler. "Get Happy” attracted attention to the new songwriting-lyricist duo identifying Arlen and Koehler as hit writers. With “Get Happy” and other rhythmic songs to their credit, the team developed the reputation as writers of "bluesy" rhythm numbers, which were much in demand in the flourishing cabarets. Throughout the early and mid-1930s, Arlen and Koehler produced songs for Harlem’s infamous Cotton Club, which was at the heart of the cabaret scene, as well as for Broadway musicals and Hollywood films, creating familiar pieces such as "Stormy Weather" and "Let's Fall in Love."
In the mid-1930s, Arlen married, and spent increasing time in California, writing for movie musicals. It was at this time that he began working with lyricist E.Y. "Yip" Harburg. In 1938, the team was hired by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to compose songs for The Wizard of Oz, the most famous of which is "Over the Rainbow", which went on to win the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Song. They also wrote "Down with Love" (featured in the 1937 Broadway show Hooray for What!), "Lydia the Tattooed Lady", for Groucho Marx in At the Circus (1939), and "Happiness is a Thing Called Joe", for Ethel Waters in Cabin in the Sky (1943). Going into the 1940s, Arlen teamed up with Johnny Mercer to write a string of successful hits: "That Old Black Magic" (1942), "Accentuate the Positive" (1944), and "Come Rain or Come Shine" (1945), among others. From that point on he worked on various Broadway shows but became more reclusive as an illness in 1954 and the deaths of his parents in 1953 (his father) and 1958 (his mother), and later his wife (1970) caused him to lose interest in composing and music in general.
Arlen died of cancer at the age of 81.

Vallee, Rudy

  • LC82152282
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1901-07-28 - 1986-07-04

Deutsch, Didier C.,

  • LC97082686
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1937 -

Didier Deutsch is a French-born record producer who has produced more than 600 titles in fields as varied as pop, jazz, big bands, classical, soundtracks and Broadway shows. He was nominated for a Grammy in 1995 for his production of the 12-CD “Frank Sinatra: The Columbia Years (1943–1952) – The Complete Recordings,” and again in 2001 or the Columbia/Legacy 26-CD set, “Soundtrack For A Century.”
Deutsch was born in 1937 in Arcachon, France, and arrived in New York City in 1962. Initially after his arrival, he wrote professionally for a wide range of magazines and newspapers, including After Dark, Essence, and The New York Times, with a special emphasis on the theater, movies, and music. In 1973, following some years in public relations in the private sector, Deutsch became publicity director at CTI Records, the jazz label created by producer Creed Taylor. After that Deutsch held various publicity and managerial positions at Tappan Zee, RCA, WEA International, and Atlantic. During this time Deustch simultaneously began working for Legacy, the reissue label controlled by Columbia Records, now Sony Music.
Over the years, Deutsch has produced recordings by many artists signed to both Columbia and Epic (Tony Bennett, Johnny Mathis, Doris Day, Jerry Vale, Rosemary Clooney, Harry James, Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, etc.). On many of those, he wrote the liner notes that helped put these recordings into their proper historical perspective.
Among his many other achievements, Deutsch lists “The Great American Composers,” a 28-volume collection of the classic tunes written by the best Tin Pan Alley songwriters – Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, Duke Ellington, Hoagy Carmichael, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Johnny Mercer, and the Gershwins, among many others, representing more than 800 selections, for Columbia House and “The Best Of Broadway,” a multi-volume series surveying the songs written for the stage and screen, for Time-Life.
In addition to his activities as a record producer, Deutsch continues to be a presence on Broadway, each season reviewing the new musical productions for the German publication “Musicals” and for the French-language “Opérette/Théâtre Musical.” A recognized theater critic, he has been covering the Broadway musical scene for more than 45 years.

Cummins, Bernie

  • LC2002109836
  • Pessoa singular

Clapper, Bernie

  • SF2018BCRK
  • Pessoa singular

Martin, Mary

  • LC50040943
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1913-12-1 - 1990-11-04

Sawicki, Richard D.

  • SF2018RSRK
  • Pessoa singular
  • 1927-01-16 - 2014-09-20
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